November 13, 2013

Tuesday was a big day for professional shake-ups in journalism. Following news that reporters Matt Bai and Brian Stelter were leaving the New York Times (for Yahoo! News and CNN, respectively), the big story was that New York Times Magazine editor Hugo Lindgren is on the way out—and apparently not at his own volition. At the Awl, Choire Sicha names fourteen people who could fill Lindgren’s shoes.

Ernest Hemingway put in a word for Ballantine Ale, Frederick Forsyth for Rolex, Mark Twain for Campbell’s soup: vintage advertisements starring famous authors.hemingway

At n+1, Ben Kunkel responds to news of Twitter going public with a manifesto arguing that social media is “basically non-economic and non-productive” and therefore should be administered like a public good. “The time has come,” Kunkel writes, “to socialize social media.”

Graphic novelist Allison Bechdel talks with the Atlantic about what it was like to see her graphic memoir Fun Home adapted for the stage.

Texas state senator Wendy Davis, the woman who became a national media sensation earlier this year for holding an eleven-hour-filibuster to block legislation that would have banned abortions in Texas after twenty weeks of pregnancy, has signed a deal to write an autobiography. The book will come out in 2014 with Blue Rider Press.

A new survey of members of the PEN American Center about government surveillance shows that it’s a topic that many writers are deeply concerned about. Out of the 528 members questioned, 73 percent said that they have “never been as worried about privacy rights and freedom of the press as they are today,” and 28 percent said they had “curtailed or avoided activities on social media.”

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