• December 9, 2014

    According to The Onion the Pew Research Center, “Americans feel better informed thanks to the Internet.”

    The Pulitzer Prize committee has expanded eligibility in two categories, investigative reporting and feature writing, to online and print magazines. They will also allow organizations to nominate journalists “employed by partnering organizations” even if the organizations are ineligible themselves.

    Vice held a suitably bacchanalian party for its twentieth anniversary.

    Jenny Diski

    Jenny Diski

    The Guardian profiles Jenny Diski, who has been writing riveting diaries about her inoperable lung cancer for the London Review of Books. Start with her first installment, “A Diagnosis,” move on to the second, and you’ll be hooked, subject matter notwithstanding. (The third and the fourth installments are paywalled: a good reason to subscribe.) The profile focuses on Diski’s relationship with Doris Lessing, who acted as her guardian from the time that Diski was fifteen, and with whom she had a complicated relationship that lasted for the rest of Lessing’s life. “She never read anything I wrote,” Diski reflects. “It was like she was always going on about how interested she was in education, but then when I became a teacher she always changed the subject. My writing could never be mentioned.”

    Ben Lerner’s year in reading, courtesy of The Millions, includes Maggie Nelson’s Argonauts, not out till next year, and Heteronomy, by poet Chris Nealon.

    At The Guardian, Jon Ronson talks to the family of Adnan Syed, whose murder conviction is being reinvestigated by Sarah Koenig for the wildly popular podcast Serial.

    First Look has launched a “social newsroom,” reported.ly, which, according to them, will “produce native journalism for social media communities, in conjunction with members of those communities.” They won’t use social media just to direct people to their site and away from their “favorite online communities,” they promise; they want to help readers “navigate the never-ending stream of rumors and footage.” What exactly this means remains to be seen.

    Tech reporter Jenna Wortham is moving from the New York Times to the Times Magazine, where she’ll be a staff writer.

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