February 20, 2015

The New York Times is trying to shift the emphasis internally from the front page of the print newspaper to the paper’s digital platforms. The paper will continue its traditional morning meetings, but rather than focusing on which stories will make the front page of the next day’s print edition, editors and writers will “compete for the best digital, rather than print, real estate.”

During the recent Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Vice Media founder Shane Smith spent $300,000 on a meal at the Bellagio steakhouse, for a group of somewhere between twelve and twenty-five guests. He’d been playing blackjack—and winning (reportedly, to the tune of $100,000).

The Morning News presents the tournament brackets and schedule for its 2015 Tournament of Books. The first two books facing off, on March 5, are David Mitchell’s Bone Clocks and Ariel Schrag’s Adam. The poet Matthea Harvey will judge.

The New York Times Magazine has dedicated its relaunch issue to David Carr: “There is no one we hoped to impress more each week than The Times’s veteran media critic, who was a mentor and a friend to many on our staff. His passion for journalism, his courage and his sense of mischief were—and remain—an inspiration to us all.” Here’s editor Jake Silverstein’s explanation of the changes he’s instituted. “This isn’t an obligatory exercise in multiplatform brand leveraging,” he insists, “or the beginning of our descent into soul-deadening content farming.” There will be a poem every week, a section called Letter of Recommendation, in which a writer endorses some favorite thing—a book, a band—and the Lives column, which was historically a first-person account, will now feature stories told to a reporter.

In still more news from the Times, Noam Scheiber will succeed Steven Greenhouse as full-time labor reporter.

 

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