• March 20, 2015

    The New York Times has dropped one of the new online opinion writers it just hired, Razib Khan. The paper announced its new hires on Wednesday; shortly afterward, Gawker described Khan as having been associated with “racist, far-right online publications” such as Taki’s Magazine, which, according to J.K..Trotter, was founded by a “flamboyantly racist Greek journalist.” Khan’s contract was terminated on Thursday.

    At The Nation, Michelle Goldberg investigates the reaction to Laura Kipnis’s recent piece about sexual misconduct rules at universities. Goldberg chalks up the harsh response to the article to a generational divide between feminisms: “There are contradictions between a feminism that emphasizes women’s erotic agency and desire to have sex on equal terms with men, and a feminism that stresses their erotic vulnerability and need to be shielded from even the subtlest forms of coercion. The politics of liberation are an uneasy fit with the politics of protection. A rigid new set of taboos has emerged to paper over this tension, often expressed in a therapeutic language of trauma and triggers that everyone is obliged to at least pretend to take seriously.”

    At the Times, Aatish Taseer laments the dominance of English in India. Whether or not people know the language has everything to do with their class background, he points out; English “re-enacts  the colonial relationship, placing certain Indians in a position the British once occupied” and creating “a linguistic line as unbreachable as the color line once was in the United States.” As a result, India’s literature suffers: Its “painful relationship with language has left it voiceless.”

    Vice is starting a new vertical, Broadly, aimed at women and headed by Tracie Egan Morrissey and Callie Beusman, formerly of Gawker.  The website will feature mostly journalism and will, reportedly, avoid “light stuff.”

    The New Republic is trying get into native advertising.

    Sarah Polley is making a new version of Little Women.

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