March 3, 2016

Longlists have been announced for the Orwell Prize for Journalism, and for the much more enticingly named Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils.

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan’s archives, which are much more extensive than you might expect, have just been purchased by several institutions in Oklahoma. The New York Times writes: “Classics from the 1960s appear in coffee-stained fragments, their author still working out lines that generations of fans would come to know by heart. (‘You know something’s happening here but you,’ reads a scribbled early copy of ‘Ballad of a Thin Man,’ omitting ‘don’t know what it is’ and the song’s famous punch line: ‘Do you, Mister Jones?’) The range of hotel stationery suggests an obsessive self-editor in constant motion.”

Technology site CNET has begun publishing new fiction monthly under the oddly chosen rubric Technically Literate.

It’s to be assumed that, despite his withdrawal last time, Donald Trump will make an appearance at tonight’s Fox News Republican debate, and the New York Times has been speaking with the moderators beforehand: “I’m a fight fan, and when you watch a referee in a match, even if the fighters are tangled up, if they’ve each got a free arm and are still punching, the ref will let them keep fighting,” Chris Wallace said. He’s also quoted as saying: “I thought that if you could see someone acting like a president on the stage, you have better eyesight than I do. . . . Having said that, in the end, if the candidates want to act like damn fools, I’m not going to stop them.” Fox boss Rupert Murdoch, on the other hand, seems all ready to rally behind Trump.

Another heartwarming image: Apparently a group of Republican legislators have their own book club, where they invite lobbyists and donors to discuss the merits of Ayn Rand and the like over lunch.

Melissa Harris-Perry, “an African American scholar in an industry that has diversity problems [and] a host whose topical focus for four years on MSNBC has been race and gender,” has refused a parting deal with the network that would have prevented her talking about the problems there via a “non-disparagement clause.” “They wanted us to cover politics in the narrowest sense,” CNN Money quotes her as saying. “I told my team, we can’t allow our own show to go off air and then provide racial cover by having me continue to host the show so people see the little black girl up there.”

Ahead of International Women’s Day next week, journalist Melissa Gira Grant lists her recommended reading on sex work and reproductive labor, including Kathi Weeks’s The Problem with Work and Samuel R. Delany’s Times Square Red, Times Square Blue.

And you won’t want to miss these previously unpublished early works by Annie Dillard.

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