• May 23, 2016

    Moby

    Moby

    Porcelain, the new memoir by Moby, is out now. Covering the years 1989 through 1999, the book describes a time when the  author rose to fame as a New York–based DJ and musician, but according to a profile in The Guardian, the author’s focus is squalor, not success. “Let’s just say his book is packed with incident,” The Guardian notes. “Lots of dodgy sex, oceans of alcohol, antics a-gogo. Plus: cockroaches, raves, death, celebrities.”

    HuffPo explains why David Foster Wallace’s famous Kenyon College commencement speech almost didn’t happen.

    The Belarussian Noble Prize–winner Svetlana Alexievich, whose Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets comes out this week, says that she has approached each of her oral histories with a question in mind: “Why doesn’t people’s suffering translate into freedom?” Her book Voices from Chernobyl consisted of testimony from survivors of the 1986 Ukranian nuclear disaster, and her latest book captures Russia’s post-Soviet era. “With every page, the book makes clear how President Vladimir V. Putin manages to hold his grip on a country of 143 million people across 11 time zones,” says the New York Times.

    Marie Calloway—whose controversial story “Adrien Brody” recounted an affair she had with a writer and magazine editor—has a new work of fiction in Playboy.

    On Thursday, xoJane, a website owned by Time Inc., posted a personal essay titled “My Former Friend’s Death Was a Blessing,” in which the author (who was first listed as Amanda Lauren and later as Anonymous) writes of an ex-friend, who was mentally ill and committed suicide: “Her death wasn’t a tragedy, her life was. She was alone and terribly unhappy when [she] died.” Jezebel has posted a response the piece: “It’s a well-known fact that outrageous confessionals—the kind that populate xoJane’s section, It Happened to Megarner traffic. Outrage, disgust and anger are the stuff of going viral (a phrase that conjures up disease as much as anything else). Yet xoJane seems to consistently cross an unspoken line, confusing any woman’s opinion as one inherently worth publishing, no matter the opinion, or its costs.” xoJane recently removed the post, replacing it with an apology by editor Jane Pratt.

    An issue of The Black Panther written by Ta-Nehisi Coates is the best-selling comic of the year so far.

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