• June 15, 2016

    “At its peak, the Orlando Sentinel had more than 350 journalists in the newsroom. On Sunday, as it ramped up to cover the nation’s deadliest mass shooting, it had about 100. It’s still the largest news organization in Orlando.” Poynter has a moving story about how breaking news gets reported by newsrooms contending with budget cuts and slashed manpower. The Sentinel spent the first part of the weekend covering the murder of the singer Christina Grimmie, and has, in recent years, done in-depth reporting on the trials of George Zimmerman and Casey Anthony.

    A Gallup poll shows Americans’ confidence in newspapers to be at an all-time low, and the National Newspaper Association is shuttering its national ad sales company. The Financial Times reports a finding from the Reuters Institute: more than half of those who get their news online are finding it via Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Microsoft added LinkedIn to its professional network: Bill Gates’s brainchild has acquired the square blue platform for $26.2 billion. The deal gives Microsoft access to reams of resumés and the personal data of LinkedIn’s 106 million active users. The New York Times reports that Microsoft and LinkedIn executives broke the ice, established trust, and sealed the deal after they “shared something with the group that was not on their personal LinkedIn profile.”

    The 123-year-old Brontë Society is riven by internecine tensions, reports The Guardian. “They seem to have split into two factions, the ‘modernisers’ and the “conservatives.’”

    ramones

    The Ramones

    Please Kill Me—Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain’s excellent oral history of punk—turns twenty this year, and to celebrate, Grove Press is putting out a special anniversary edition with additional photos and a new afterword. Meanwhile, McNeil and McCain are planning their comeback tour: “We figured the best way to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk and the fortieth Anniversary of the Ramones playing CBGB’s for the first time, would be to take the show on the road . . . reading from the Twentieth Anniversary Edition, as well as telling stories, playing great tunes as guest DJs, and partying up a storm!”

Advertisement