January 4, 2017

On January 15th, the organization Writers Resist will be holding events around the US, as authors band together to promote democracy. A reading on the steps of The New York Public Library will feature Andrew Solomon, Masha Gessen, Robert Pinsky, and Rita Dove, and local events are being organized throughout the nation. The National Book Critics Circle has dedicated its “NBCC Reads” series to the topic of resistance literature, posting discussions by authors such as Jonathan Lethem and T. J. Siles, with new entries being added daily.  

After twelve years at Fox News, Megyn Kelly is leaving the network and joining NBC. Fox reportedly offered Kelly $20 million dollars to stay, but NBC gave her a better package: Kelly will host her own daytime show, get an anchor position on an evening news program, and regularly appear on NBC’s special programming and big-event stories.

Lindy West, the journalist who memorably appeared on This American Life confronting the man who had trolled her online by impersonating her dead father, has written a column at The Guardian explaining why she has quit Twitter after years of dedicated use: “I hate to disappoint anyone, but the breaking point for me wasn’t the trolls themselves . . . it was the global repercussions of Twitter’s refusal to stop them. . . . How much hate speech will bystanders ignore? When will Twitter intervene and start protecting its users?”

At the Globe and Mail, writers are contributing stories about Canada’s history, in celebration of the nation’s 150th birthday. First up, Rivka Galchen pens a fictional sixteenth-century worksheet, that reads as a guide for weary travelers to far-off lands.

Nicholas Thompson

Nicholas Thompson, the editor of newyorker.com, has been named editor in chief of Wired magazine. According to Recode, the publication’s former editor, Scott Dadich, is leaving to start a “strategy, design and content firm.” Explaining the move, Dadich said in a press release: “No one can see the future, but I know I’m happiest when I’m chasing it — that’s why I’ve loved creating a new Wired every single day. Covering the worlds of business and technology, however valuable, is watching from the sidelines. I felt it was time to get in the game with my own company,”

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