• March 2, 2017

    The Evergreen Review has been reborn as an online publication. The legendary magazine, which was started in 1957 by Barney Rosset and folded in 1973, published works by the likes of Samuel Beckett, William S. Burroughs, Susan Sontag and many other notable contributors. The new version is headed by editor-in-chief Dale Peck and published by John Oakes of OR Books. Peck says he plans to make the revived magazine “an international forum for un-sayable things.”

    ABC News president James Goldston has reacted to a petition signed by more than two-hundred ABC staffers, calling on the network to boycott White House press conferences if any outlets are barred from attending: “We’ve expressed our concerns to the White House that it operates in a way that’s open, transparent and fair. . . . And we will continue to stand with our colleagues who cover the White House and to protest when any government official fails to live up to those standards.”

    Katie Kitamura. Photo: Sophie Fiennes.

    Tonight at Greenlight Books in Brooklyn, Katie Kitamura discusses her new novel, A Separation, with Rivka Galchen.

    At the Rumpus, Lauren Elkin talks about her new book, Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice, and London. Describing her subject, Elkin says, “Flânerie is always political, but the flâneuse is more aware of this. She has to be. . . . If you’re born into the center of the culture you can fetishize the margins, but if you’re born on the margins you have to do what you can to get along.”

    Yesterday would have been Robert Lowell’s one-hundredth birthday. At The Guardian, Max Liu makes the case for the poet’s continued importance: “It’s not always easy to feel sympathy for an artist with a trust fund and whose family have their own graveyard. But Lowell knew he was privileged, and the beauty and specificity with which he describes his world creates space for the reader to reflect on their own experience.”  

     

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