• March 3, 2017

    At The Atlantic, Adrienne LaFrance explores the timing of the contemporary news cycle, asking, “Why Do the Big Stories Keep Breaking at Night?”

    Tina Brown

    A book based on the diaries Tina Brown kept during her eight years as editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair will be published in November. Brown, who was head of the magazine from 1984 to 1992, says that when she revisited the journals, she “rediscovered how madcap those days were—how chancy, how new, how supercharged.” Henry Holt publisher Stephen Rubin assures readers that the book will have plenty of juicy gossip, promising that Brown will “spill some dirt on some of the flamboyant explosions around her, many of which she ignited herself. This will be a tell-all for the centuries.”

    A lawsuit stemming from BuzzFeed’s publication of the Steele dossier, the unverified document alleging ties between Donald Trump and the Russian government, has been moved to federal court. The suit claims that BuzzFeed libeled Aleksej Gubarev, a tech executive whose name appeared in the document (and which BuzzFeed redacted and later apologized for including).

    At Page-Turner, George Saunders considers the work of Grace Paley, the late author and activist, whose collected writings will be published next month. When you are reading Paley, Saunders writes, “A world is appearing before you that is richer and stranger than you could possibly have imagined, and that world gains rooms and vistas and complications with every phrase. What you are experiencing is intimate contact with an extraordinary intelligence, which causes the pleasant sensation of one’s personality receding and being replaced by the writer’s consciousness.”

    At the New York Times, Ta Nehisi-Coates talks about his Marvel Comics series, “Black Panther,” and the way that politics has always shaped comics: “When you take a book like Spider-Man or Daredevil and the big thing is crime fighting, I don’t think that’s distant from the time when those characters were created. During that period, we had this rising crime, and the city was seen a certain way in a way that Manhattan is not seen today. Even the decision to create Black Panther: It was not an apolitical decision to have this black character in Africa, in this advanced nation, and have him be highly intelligent. All of these were political decisions.”

  • March 2, 2017

    The Evergreen Review has been reborn as an online publication. The legendary magazine, which was started in 1957 by Barney Rosset and folded in 1973, published works by the likes of Samuel Beckett, William S. Burroughs, Susan Sontag and many other notable contributors. The new version is headed by editor-in-chief Dale Peck and published by John Oakes of OR Books. Peck says he plans to make the revived magazine “an international forum for un-sayable things.”

    ABC News president James Goldston has reacted to a petition signed by more than two-hundred ABC staffers, calling on the network to boycott White House press conferences if any outlets are barred from attending: “We’ve expressed our concerns to the White House that it operates in a way that’s open, transparent and fair. . . . And we will continue to stand with our colleagues who cover the White House and to protest when any government official fails to live up to those standards.”

    Katie Kitamura. Photo: Sophie Fiennes.

    Tonight at Greenlight Books in Brooklyn, Katie Kitamura discusses her new novel, A Separation, with Rivka Galchen.

    At the Rumpus, Lauren Elkin talks about her new book, Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice, and London. Describing her subject, Elkin says, “Flânerie is always political, but the flâneuse is more aware of this. She has to be. . . . If you’re born into the center of the culture you can fetishize the margins, but if you’re born on the margins you have to do what you can to get along.”

    Yesterday would have been Robert Lowell’s one-hundredth birthday. At The Guardian, Max Liu makes the case for the poet’s continued importance: “It’s not always easy to feel sympathy for an artist with a trust fund and whose family have their own graveyard. But Lowell knew he was privileged, and the beauty and specificity with which he describes his world creates space for the reader to reflect on their own experience.”  

     

  • March 1, 2017

    Michelle and Barack Obama

    Barack and Michelle Obama have sold the world rights to their forthcoming books to Penguin Random House. The deal was made after an intense bidding war in which offers from Penguin, HarperCollins, Macmillan, and Simon & Schuster reportedly went over $60 million, with the times reporting that the number “stretched well into eight figures.” Although the amount has yet to be confirmed, it will likely be a historic amount for memoirs from a president and first lady—Bill and Hillary Clinton’s post-presidency books sold for a combined $18 million. The Times notes that President Obama’s memoir “could provide a chance to reframe and highlight the former president’s legacy, at a moment when a new Republican administration is making an effort to dismantle some of his signature legislation.”

    Ursula K. Le Guin, Junot Diaz, and Ann Patchett were among fourteen new members inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters this week. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Zadie Smith were added as honorary members. The official induction ceremony will be held in May.

    BuzzFeed investigates how “hyperpartisan political news gets made.” After looking at nearly identical articles on Kellyanne Conway’s alleged TV ban from websites Liberal Society and Conservative 101—which are owned by the same parent company—Craig Silverman concludes that “all it takes to turn a liberal partisan story into a conservative one is to literally change a few words.”

    At Der Spiegel Veit Medick profiles Alex Jones, the Infowars host and conspiracy theorist who claims to talk regularly on the phone with Trump. Among other things, Jones believes that gay marriage is a conspiracy “to get rid of God,” and that “the government possesses weather weapons it can use to create artificial tornadoes.” According to Medick, “there is no subject on which Jones does not have his own version of the truth to offer, one supported by no facts whatsoever.”

    CNN has confirmed that they will attend this year’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner. The news organization will bring journalism students as their guests instead of celebrities. In a statement, CNN said, “We feel there is no better way to underscore our commitment to the health and longevity of a free press than to celebrate its future.”

    Tonight at Symphony Space, authors and actors pay tribute to Clarice Lispector.

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