• August 17, 2017

    Saeed Jones and Isaac Fitzgerald

    Isaac Fitzgerald is leaving his post at Buzzfeed Books to start a new “morning show” with poet and Buzzfeed culture editor Saeed Jones. The show, called AM to DM, is part of Buzzfeed, and will be livestreamed through Twitter daily from 8-9am. It begins on September 25, and is, according to Fitzgerald, “a one-of-a-kind morning show … connecting an up-to-date audience with stories happening now, right from inside the news cycle.”

    Jonathan Chait—the author of Audacity, a book about the Obama administration—has written an article that shows how Trump’s aides have tried to conceal the president’s racist ideas from the country.

    Barack Obama’s series of Tweets about racism, which were issued following the recent events in Charlottesville, have broken a record, with more than 3 million likes.  

    Lena Dunham talks about Lenny Books, the new Random House imprint that she is launching with Jenni Konner. Lenny, which grew out of a newsletter Dunham produced with Konner, is releasing its first book this week: Jenny Zhang’s story collection Sour Heart. “It was essential to Jenni and me that we use the gift of our platform to give voice to a diverse group of women who need to be heard,” Dunham says in an interview with Publisher’s Weekly. “It has never been more important that we hear from every kind of woman and understand the specificities of her experience—and that happens to be the goal of Lenny.”

    Penguin Press has released the cover image for Meg Wolitzer’s new novel, The Female Persuasion, which will be released next April.

    Novelist Amit Chaudhuri—whose books include The Immortals and Odysseus Abroad—argues in The Guardian that the Booker Prize is bad for authors. The reason: writers who hope to win it acquiesce to the values of capitalism. “I’m not saying that the Booker shouldn’t exist. I’m saying that it requires an alternative, and the alternative isn’t another prize,” Chaudhuri writes. “It has to do instead with writers reclaiming agency. The meaning of a writer’s work must be created, and argued for, by writers themselves, and not by some extraneous source of endorsement.”

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