May 11, 2015

Sarah Maslin Nir

Sarah Maslin Nir

Sarah Maslin Nir’s two-part New York Times expose of the exploitation of women who work in New York’s nail salons relied on interviews in four different languages, and is being published in four languages. In addition to English, the story is appearing in Korean, Chinese, and Spanish. Though the Times has translated stories before, it has never done so “at this scale,” says the Columbia Journalism Review. “This effort is part of a bigger New York Times initiative to translate more stories into languages of the cultures written about, Nir says, and it’s one that raises important questions. How should journalists report on groups that are part of national and local communities when they don’t speak the majority language? And when the reporting is over, how can newsrooms include those groups so that they, too, are part of the audience?”

Yahoo has accused ex-staffer Cecile Lal of giving secrets to the author and Business Insider reporter Nicholas Carlson. Bloomberg News Reports: “Lal’s assistance last year to Nicholas Carlson for his book, Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo!, included searching confidential archives to support his writings and giving him her credentials to a password-protected site, according to the complaint.” Yahoo has sued Lal, claiming that she “brazenly” violated her confidentiality agreement.

Meg Wolitzer reflects on her literary idol Mary McCarthy.

“There are writers whose every word is just not quite right. If you were to try to fix all those words, you would have a new piece and an enraged second-rate writer”: “Comma Queen” Mary Norris discusses her new grammatically sophisticated memoir, Between You and Me, about her experiences as a copyeditor at the New Yorker. Also, Norris recalls what Philip Roth wrote to an editor upon seeing Norris’s proofreading comments: “Who is this woman? And will she come live with me?

The Rumpus website has announced changes to its masthead.

Atlantic editor Chris BoDenner has a plan for making trolls irrelevant.

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