April 10, 2018

The family of Sunday Times journalist Marie Colvin has filed a war crimes case against the Syrian government. The suit claims that in 2012, Colvin, alongside photographer Rémi Ochlik “was assassinated by government forces of the Syrian Arab Republic as she reported on the suffering of civilians.” The Intercept looks into the evidence submitted with the lawsuit, including a video of her final moments and “nearly 2,000 pages of documents” that “provide detailed and unprecedented evidence to support the claim that Colvin was deliberately hunted and killed as part of a policy by the Assad regime to eliminate journalists.”

Lorrie Moore

Malala Yousafzai’s father Ziauddin Yousafzai will publish a memoir with Little, Brown. What Love Teaches Me will be released next fall.

Rights to Michelle McNamara’s true-crime book, I’ll Be Gone in the Dark, have been bought by HBO. The network plans to adapt the late author’s work into a docuseries.

Three members of the Swedish Academy have resigned following sexual abuse allegations against Jean-Claude Arnault, “a cultural figure with close ties to the institution,” the New York Times reports.

Gizmodo Media Group CEO Raju Narisetti is leaving Univision, which the Daily Beast attributes to the parent company’s “plans to get more directly involved with its flagship digital media property as it weighs deep cuts.”

Progressive news site AlterNet has been bought by RawStory. In a statement, the company explained that the move was “part of a long-planned transition that will ensure the stability and future of the AlterNet brand.”

Lauren O’Neill-Butler talks to See What Can Be Done author Lorrie Moore about personal essays, working with New York Review of Books editor Robert Silvers, and not being motivated by FOMO. “I just had to look up FOMO. I never write anything out of fear,” Moore said. “And certainly not fear of missing out. Does FOMO stand for something else? Feelings of malaise offset?”

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